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NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft is officially the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space. The 36-year-old probe is about 12 billion miles (19 billion kilometers) from the Sun.

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Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

New and unexpected data indicate Voyager 1 has been traveling for about one year through plasma, or ionized gas, present in the space between stars. Voyager is in a transitional region immediately outside the solar bubble, where some effects from our sun are still evident. A report on the analysis of this new data, led by Don Gurnett and the plasma wave science team at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, is published in the journal Science.

Voyager 1 does not have a working plasma sensor, so scientists needed a different way to measure the spacecraft’s plasma environment to make a definitive determination of its location. A coronal mass ejection, a massive burst of solar wind and magnetic fields, that erupted from the Sun in March 2012 provided scientists with the data they needed. When this blast from the Sun eventually overtook Voyager 1 some 13 months later, in April 2013, the plasma around the spacecraft began to vibrate like a violin string. On April 9, Voyager 1’s plasma wave instrument detected the movement. The pitch of the oscillations helped scientists determine the density of the plasma. The particular oscillations meant the spacecraft was bathed in plasma more than 40 times denser than what they had encountered in the outer layer of the heliosphere. This density is that which is expected in interstellar space.

Much more information is available on NASA’s Voyager page, and via this JPL press release, which includes more images and a short video. The sound of interstellar space may be heard here.

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