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From an article on the Sky and Telescope website by Monica Young, originally posted on December 10, 2015.

More than half of the potential giant planets detected by NASA’s Kepler satellite might not be planets after all according to a study by Alexandre Santerne (University of Porto, Portugal, and Aix Marseille University, France). A press release following the Extreme Solar Systems III conference in Hawaii summarized the study with the headline: “Half of Kepler’s Giant Exoplanet Candidates are False Positives.”

Common-False-Positives-480

Credit: NASA/Ames Research Center

Santerne and colleagues followed up on Kepler’s long list of planet candidates during a five-year observing campaign. Between July 2010 and July 2015, the team spent 370 nights observing 129 planet candidates out of more than 4,000 that were identified by Kepler, and only 45 of these turned out to be bona fide planets. The rest fell into 3 different categories: 3 were brown dwarfs, 63 were multiple-star systems, and 18 were neither of these, but could not be confirmed as planets. Even if all of those 18 cases turned out to be planets, 51% of Kepler’s giant potential planets would still turn out not to be real.

Previous studies found a much lower ‘false-positive’ rate for Kepler’s planet candidates. However, according to experts on Kepler data, this seemingly surprising high false-positive rate is not surprising at all.

For more information on our Solar System, and others, see Chapter 9 of The Cosmos. Link to the original article here.

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