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From JPL press releases, July 4, 2016:

While Americans celebrated the evening of Independence Day, 1.7 billion miles (2.7 billion kilometres) NASA’s Juno spacecraft, launched nearly five years ago, reached its final destination: the most massive planet in our Solar System, Jupiter.

juno_burn

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Juno now starts its tour of Jupiter in a 53.5-day orbit. The spacecraft saves fuel by executing a burn that places it in a capture orbit with a 53.5-day orbit instead of going directly for the 14-day orbit that will occur during the mission’s primary science collection period. The 14-day science orbit phase will begin after the final burn of the mission for Juno’s main engine on October 19.

Most of Juno’s instruments deal with Jupiter’s particles and magnetic field, which is 20,000 times more powerful than Earth’s. The main instruments are in a vault made of 400 pounds of titanium to protect them from the strong radiation. The Junocam, its imaging camera, is outside that protection, and may not last as long as other instruments; further, it will give images as it rotates that will have to be transformed to the equivalent of steady views.

Links: Full details via the JPL press release; NASA Juno mission page; NY Times: Jupiter and its moons graphic.

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