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Monthly Archives: September 2017

Adapted from an article by Kenneth Chang published in The New York Times, September 14, 2017:

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, the intrepid robotic explorer of Saturn’s magnificent beauty, has finally ended its 20-year journey. By design, the probe vanished into Saturn’s atmosphere, disintegrating moments after its final signal slipped away into the background noise of the Solar System. Until the end, new measurements streamed one billion miles back to Earth, preceded by the spacecraft’s last picture show of dazzling sights from around the Sun’s sixth planet.

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Credit: Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

 

The mission for Cassini, in orbit since 2004, stretched far beyond the original four-year plan, sending back multitudes of striking photographs, solving some mysteries and upending prevailing notions about the Solar System with completely unexpected discoveries.

Even at the end, 20 years after launch, Cassini and its instruments remained in good working shape. The plutonium power source was still generating electricity. But there was not enough propellant fuel left to safely send Cassini anywhere except into Saturn.

In the very last phase of the mission, Cassini dove through the gap between Saturn and the planet’s innermost ring. This provided new, sharp views of the rings and allowed the craft to probe the planet’s interior, as another NASA’s Juno spacecraft is doing at Jupiter.

Links: read the full article; also NYT’s ‘100 Images from Cassini’ feature.

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