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Tag Archives: dark energy

From a Berkeley Lab press release, April 30, 2015:

For the past several years, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been planning the construction of and developing technologies for a very special instrument that will create the most extensive three-dimensional map of the universe to date. Called DESI for Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, this project will trace the growth history of the Universe rather like the way you might track a child’s height with pencil marks climbing up a doorframe. But DESI will start from the present and work back into the past.

DESI will make a full 3D map pinpointing galaxies’ locations across the Universe. The map, unprecedented in its size and scope, will allow scientists to test theories of dark energy, the mysterious force that appears to cause the accelerating expansion and stretching of the Universe first discovered in observations of supernovae by groups led by Saul Perlmutter at Berkeley Lab and by Brian Schmidt, now at Australian National University, and Adam Riess, now at Johns Hopkins University.

Read interviews with Michael Levi and David Schlegel, two key physicists who have been involved in DESI from the beginning, here.

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Mordecai-Mark Mac Low, Curator of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, presents short, fun features on the history of mysterious dark matter (see Section 16.10) and dark energy (see Section 19.3b).

Credit: AMNH Rose Center for Earth and Space and Hayden Planetarium

The AMNH’s new planetarium show ‘Dark Universe’ celebrates the pivotal discoveries that have led us to greater knowledge of the structure and history of the Universe and our place in it — and to new frontiers for exploration. It is narrated by the planetarium director, Neil deGrasse Tyson. A trailer for the new show may be seen here, along with further information about the show’s creation.