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Tag Archives: ICECube

An article in ScienceNews reports that data from the IceCube experiment under Antarctic ice have shown that the highest energy neutrinos they detect come from all directions, indicating that they are probably at cosmological distances (see Section 12.7c, pp. 324-325). The results were first announced at the American Physical Society’s meeting in April 2014.

Neutrinos open a window into the very distant and high-energy Universe that is extremely difficult to access by any other means. This is because neutrinos, unlike every other subatomic particle, are electrically neutral and rarely interact with matter. By detecting these particles and charting the directions they come from, scientists aim to identify the sources of neutrinos: star-forming galaxies, supermassive black holes or perhaps some as-yet unknown violent objects. These sources can accelerate neutrinos and other subatomic particles to energies far greater than any human-made machine could achieve.

Credit: Sven Lidstrom, IceCube/NSF

IceCube was specifically built to aid in this quest. For three years, strings of sensors stretching as deep as 2.5 kilometers below the surface of an Antarctic glacier have detected subtle flashes of light created when neutrinos and other particles collide with atoms. Last year, IceCube researchers identified 28 high-energy neutrinos from all directions that are almost certainly from outside the Solar System. The researchers have since found nine more, including the highest energy neutrino ever detected.

To complement this painstaking search for the highest energy neutrinos, Christopher Weaver, an IceCube physicist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, decided to cast a wider net for the larger population of slightly lower-energy astronomical neutrinos. His approach relied on selecting particles that fell from the skies of the Northern Hemisphere, whizzed through Earth’s interior and arrived at IceCube from below. Only neutrinos, and not other particles that often trigger IceCube’s sensors from above, can make it through Earth’s dense crust and core. He also limited his search to detections at a specific energy – about 100 trillion electron volts – so that the number of neutrinos from space wouldn’t be dwarfed by the amount of neutrinos produced in the atmosphere. (IceCube’s sensors can’t distinguish between the two.)

That left Weaver with about 35,000 neutrinos, at least some of which began their journeys beyond the Solar System. He tracked the directions they came from and found no evidence of clustering in any particular parts of the sky – a finding that confirmed previous analyses and suggests that no local source is primarily responsible for the population of neutrinos whizzing by Earth. As IceCube continues to collect more data, scientists hope these two independent neutrino search methods will converge on trends in the neutrinos’ direction of arrival. It’s an exciting time in neutrino astrophysics.

Links: ScienceNews article

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A massive telescope buried in the Antarctic ice has detected 28 record-breaking, extremely high-energy neutrinos – elementary particles that likely originate far beyond our Solar System. (See Sections 12.7c and 13.2g)

The achievement, which comes nearly 25 years after the pioneering idea of detecting neutrinos in ice, provides the first solid evidence for astrophysical neutrinos from cosmic accelerators and has been hailed as the dawn of a new age of astronomy. The team of researchers that detected the neutrinos with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica published a paper describing the detections on November 22, 2013, in the journal Science.

Credit: IceCube Collaboration

The neutrinos had energies greater than 1,000,000,000,000,000 electron volts, or 1 peta-electron volt (PeV). Two of these neutrinos had energies many thousands of times higher than the highest-energy neutrino that any man-made particle accelerator has ever produced. (1 joule of energy = 6.2419 × 1018 eV.)

While not telling scientists what the cosmic accelerators are or where they’re located, the IceCube results do provide scientists with a compass that can help guide them to the answers. Unlike other cosmic particles, neutrinos are electrically neutral and nearly massless, so that they travel through space in a straight line from their point of origin, passing through virtually everything in their path without being deflected by interstellar masses and magnetic fields.

Credit: Jamie Yang, IceCube Collaboration

The IceCube observatory consists of over 5,000 basketball-sized light detectors called Digital Optical Modules (DOMs). These are suspended along 86 strings that are embedded in a cubic kilometer of clear ice starting 1.5 kilometers beneath the Antarctic surface. Out of the trillions of neutrinos that pass through the ice each day, a couple of hundred will collide with oxygen nuclei, yielding the blue light of Cherenkov radiation that IceCube’s DOMs detect.

Links: LBNL press release; U. Wisconsin press release (with image gallery); Penn State press release (with movie).