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Tag Archives: lander

From a news report on Phys.org, April 20, 2015:

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the plan for a Moon lander. If successful, Japan will be the fourth country to send an unmanned probe to the moon after Russia, the United States, and China.

JAXA plans to launch the mission as early as 2018, with a development cost estimated at up to 15 billion yen ($126 million). The probe, named SLIM (Smart Lander for Investigating Moon), will be carried by the nation’s solid-fuel “Epsilon” rocket.

Link: Phys.org article.

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Adapted from a press release of Mars Odyssey’s THEMIS team, March 5. 2015:

NASA’s next Mars space probe, a lander named InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport), is due to touch down on the Red Planet in September 2016. InSight carries two main instruments, a heat-flow probe and a seismometer, both being deployed using a robotic arm. The heat probe requires that the ground within reach of the arm be penetrable by the probe, which will hammer itself into the soil to a depth of three to five meters.

insight

Credit: NASA/JPL

InSight was provisionally selected for funding through NASA’s Discovery Program for launch in 2016 and the spacecraft design is based on NASA’s successful Phoenix Mars lander mission. It will touch down in one place and stay there for its entire mission, projected to last two Earth years. Its landing place has been chosen carefully with help from a Mars-orbiting heat-sensitive camera on NASA’s Mars Odyssey orbiter.

Links: THEMIS press release, ASU press release, InSight mission home.

 

The European Space Agency’s ExoMars mission is set for launch in 2018.  A rover and a lander are included, to search for evidence of past and present life on Mars. The orbiter, part of the ExoMars 2016 mission, will sample the Martian atmospheric trace gases, such as methane and provide communications. The rover will leave the landing platform and drill into the surface to search for potential fossils, relevant minerals, and organic molecules (with chirality as biomarkers).

ExoMars_combi_350

Credit: ESA

In addition to its scientific exploration, the mission will help test in-situ technologies that might pave the way for a future international Mars sample return mission.

Links: ExoMars 2018 mission overview; ESA Mars homepage.

Adapted from a European Space Agency press release, September 26, 2014:

ESA’s Rosetta mission will deploy its lander, Philae, to the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on November 12, 2014. Philae’s landing site, currently known as Site J, is located on the smaller of the comet’s two ‘lobes’, with a backup site on the larger lobe. The sites were selected just six weeks after Rosetta arrived at the comet on August 6, following its 10-year journey through the Solar System.

Philae’s primary landing site

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

The main focus to date has been to survey 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko in order to prepare for the first ever attempt to soft-land on a comet. Site J was chosen unanimously over four other candidate sites as the primary landing site because the majority of terrain within a square kilometre area has slopes of less than 30° relative to the local vertical and because there are relatively few large boulders. The area also receives sufficient daily illumination to recharge Philae and continue surface science operations beyond the initial 64-hour battery-powered phase.

Final confirmation of the primary landing site and its landing scenario will be made on October 14 after a formal review, which will include the results of additional high-resolution analysis of the landing site and its back-up conducted in the meantime. Should the backup site be chosen at this stage, the landing attempt can still take place on November 12.

Links: the ESA press release, including links to further resources on Rosetta and Philae and this short movie showing Philae’s planned descent.