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Tag Archives: solar eclipse

Millions of people across Indonesia and the Central Pacific have witnessed a total solar eclipse. Because the eclipse path crossed the International Date Line, in the local time zones it began early on Wednesday, March 9, and ended late on Tuesday, March 8.

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Credit: timeanddate.com

 

The Cosmos author, Jay M. Pasachoff, shares his view of totality from the south side of Ternate, in the Maluku Islands of eastern Indonesia:

“All the eclipse phenomena were visible: diamond ring, Baily’s beads, prominences (with a particularly bright prominence at the 9 o’clock position) and the corona, but through thin clouds.”

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Credit: Jay M. Pasachoff

Different views of the eclipse provided the Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) on March 10, 11, and 12: wide angle view, looking down from NASA’s DISCOVR satellite, and a low-resolution flash spectrum.

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The November 11, 2013, Astronomy Picture of the Day shows the total solar eclipse of November 3, as covered by several different solar observatories.

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Credit and copyright: D. Seaton (ROB), A. Davis & J. M. Pasachoff (Williams College Eclipse Expedition), NRL, ESA, NASA, NatGeo.

The innermost image shows the Sun in ultraviolet light as recorded over a few hours by ESA’s PROBA2 mission in a Sun-synchronous low Earth orbit. This image is surrounded by a ground-based eclipse image, reproduced in blue, taken from Gabon by Allen Davis and Jay M. Pasachoff during the Williams College Eclipse Expedition. Further out is a circular blocked region used to artificially dim the central Sun by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument of the Sun-orbiting SOHO spacecraft. The outermost image – showing the outflowing solar corona – was taken by LASCO ten minutes after the eclipse and shows an outflowing solar corona.

Over the past few weeks, our Sun has been showing an unusually high amount of sunspots, CMEs, and flares – activity that was generally expected as the Sun is currently going through Solar Maximum – the busiest part of its 11 year solar cycle. This image is a picturesque montage of many solar layers at once that allows solar astronomers to better match up active areas on or near the Sun’s surface with outflowing jets in the Sun’s corona.

p. 277: A Closer Look 10.2. Solar Eclipses of 2013

The two eclipses shown, both from Australia, are actually November 14, 2012, for the total solar eclipse and May 10, 2013, for the annular eclipse.